Virtual conference offers advice on resilience, emergency preparedness

BS: From Katrina to the 1995 Chicago heat wave, history reveals that older grownups are disproportionately impacted by catastrophes. Persistent health conditions, mobility difficulties, and living alone can make older grownups more susceptible to emergency situations. When older grownups plan and link with buddies and neighbors, they can much better endure challenges.
For many older adults and people with impairments who utilize electronic medical devices, having trustworthy source of energy can be a life-and-death concern.

While emergencies like pandemics and natural catastrophes are challenging for everyone, the impact is typically higher for older grownups. Thats why AARP Oregon is hosting Resilient Futures 2021, a complimentary virtual conference June 29 and 30 on disaster preparedness and neighborhood durability.
Subject matter specialists and emergency management leaders will discuss how to get ready for the next emergency, like preparing an emergency situation package, producing an interaction plan and building a strong social media network to count on.
Energy Trusts Senior Outreach Manager Karen Chase and Program Manager Jeni Hall will be on hand to discuss clean energy resources and innovations that specify and city governments can utilize to get ready for emergency situations.
Here Bandana Shrestha, engagement director at AARP Oregon, talks about the conference and why strength need to be on all of our minds.
What details will people find out at the conference?
BS: The two-day conference offers a range of sessions created to empower individuals with the information, resources and tools to strategy and prepare for the next emergency situation. We all need to build greater understanding of emergency situation preparedness and community resilience.
Individuals can expect to discover how to make a “go bag,” details of Oregons State Resilience Plan, and how Oregon city officials are assisting Oregon prepare for the next severe weather condition or manufactured emergency situation occasions.
Why is strength something older individuals especially should be considering and planning for?
BS: From Katrina to the 1995 Chicago heat wave, history shows that older grownups are disproportionately affected by disasters. Chronic health conditions, movement challenges, and living alone can make older grownups more vulnerable to emergency situations. When older grownups plan and link with pals and next-door neighbors, they can much better hold up against obstacles.
For example, during the current wildfires of 2020, a female in a 55-plus neighborhood activated her neighbors, got everybodys phone number and helped her neighbors develop an evacuation strategy. City officials were too busy to assist out.
What does energy (energy efficiency, solar and renewable energy, and so on) involve making your house more resistant in the face of catastrophes like droughts and wildfires?
BS: Without reliable energy sources in your home, many of us are unable to do the fundamental activities of everyday life from cooking to interacting. For lots of older grownups and individuals with specials needs who utilize electronic medical gadgets, having reliable source of energy can be a life-and-death problem. For instance, do you have back up batteries? Do you have an alternate source of heating or lighting? Can your next-door neighbors assist?
Register for the virtual Resilient Futures 2021 conference at aarp.cvent.com/resilientfutures.

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