How to Prevent People from Installing Extensions in Chrome

House Users: Use the Registry Editor.
Youll have to edit the Windows Registry to make this change if you have Windows 10 Home. You can also do it by doing this if you have Windows Pro or Enterprise however just feel more comfy operating in the Registry rather of the Group Policy Editor. (If you have Pro or Enterprise, though, we suggest using the much easier Group Policy Editor as described listed below.).
Heres our basic warning: The Registry Editor is a powerful tool, and misusing it can render your system unstable or even unusable. This is a quite basic hack, and you shouldnt have any problems as long as you stick to the guidelines. That being said, if youve never ever worked with it previously, think about checking out how to use the Registry Editor prior to you get going. And definitely back up the Registry ( and your computer system!) prior to making changes.
RELATED: Learning to Use the Registry Editor Like a Pro.
To open the Registry Editor, hit Start, type “regedit” in the search box, and press Enter.

Now, use a comparable process to open the “Block external extensions for being set up” setting to avoid anybody from setting up an external custom extension in Chrome. When the setting window opens, click the “Enabled” alternative, and then click the “OK” button.

Next, right-click the “Chrome” subkey once again, and choose New > > Key. Name this key “BlockExternalExtensions” without quotes.

After you make your modification, nobody can set up any extensions from the Chrome Web Store or from any other area. You can introduce Chrome and attempt setting up an extension to evaluate whether youve set up the policy appropriately.

Navigate to the folder where you unpacked the Chrome policy design templates and drill down to policy_templates > > windows > > adm.

Click the “Action” menu at the top, and select the “Add/Remove Templates” alternative.

Right-click on the “ExtensionInstallBlocklist” subkey, select “New,” pick the “String Value” option, and set “1” (without quotes) as its worth name.

By including these 2 keys, you can make sure that no other user can install Chrome extensions from the Chrome Web Store or any other online source. The only drawback is that you have to remember the course for these new subkeys.
Windows 10 Professional: Use Group Policy.
If your PC runs the Windows 10 Professional or Enterprise edition, you can avoid tinkering the windows registry. Instead, you can utilize the Local Group Policy Editor to prevent others from including Chrome extensions.
Download the Chrome policy design templates zip file from Google and unzip it on your PC.

When the new Show Contents window opens, type an asterisk (*) in the empty box under the Value heading and click the “OKAY” button.

In the left pane, right-click on the “Policies” folder. Select the “New” choice, and then select the “Key” option. Name this brand-new subkey “Google” without quotes.

To release the Group Policy Editor, hit Start, type “gpedit.msc” into Windows Search, and press Enter.

In the right-hand pane, double-click the “Configure extension setup blocklist” setting. When the setting window opens, choose the “Enabled” option and click the “Show” button.

In the Local Group Policy Editor window, in the left-hand pane, drill down to Computer Configuration > > Administrative Templates.

Click the “OK” button in the “Configure extension installation blocklist” window to close it.

In the right-hand pane, double-click on the “1” value name to open its homes. In the box under the Value data choice, key in an asterisk (*), and click the “OKAY” button.

You may want to avoid them from installing extensions in Chrome if you let your household or other individuals browse the web using Chrome on your PC. Heres how to benefit from a Chrome policy meant for system administrators to disable extension installation.
You can use either the Registry Editor or the Local Group Policy Editor The Registry Editor is accessible on all Windows 10 editions. The Local Group Policy Editor is not available on the Home edition of Windows 10.
Keep in mind: Using the Registry Editor or Local Group Policy Editor to obstruct individuals from installing Chrome extensions will make Google Chrome state its “Managed by your organization” on its Settings screen.

Right-click on the “BlockExternalExtensions” subkey, select “New,” choose the “String Value” option, and set “1” as its value name.

In the right-hand pane, double-click on the “1” worth name to open its properties. In package under the Value data alternative, enter an asterisk (*), and click the “OK” button.

When the Chrome design template file appears under the Current Policy Templates list, click the “Close” button.

Right-click the “Chrome” subkey and choose New > > Key as soon as again. Call this secret “ExtensionInstallBlocklist” without quotes.

Double-click on the “en-US” language folder, choose the “chrome.adm” file, and click the “Open” button. You can choose a different language folder matching the system language of your PC.

In the Register Editor window, drill down to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > > SOFTWARE > > WOW6432Node > > Policies if youre utilizing a 64-bit variation of Windows.
If youre using a 32-bit variation of Windows, go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > > SOFTWARE > > Policies instead.
Not exactly sure which variation of Windows youre using? Heres how to check whether youre utilizing a 32-bit or 64-bit variation.

In the left-hand pane of the Local Group Policy Editor window, drill down to Computer Configuration > > Administrative Templates > > Classic Administrative Templates (ADM) > > Google > > Google Chrome > > Extensions.

From the new window that opens, click the “Add” button.

The Registry Editor is available on all Windows 10 editions. The Local Group Policy Editor is not offered on the Home edition of Windows 10.
(If you have Pro or Enterprise, however, we recommend using the much easier Group Policy Editor as explained below.).
In the left pane, right-click on the “Policies” folder. Call it “Chrome” without quotes.

Next, right-click on the recently produced “Google” subkey. Select the “New” alternative, and then select the “Key” to include a new subkey. Name it “Chrome” without quotes.

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